A Man From New Jersey Gets Infected by the Rare Jamestown Canyon Virus That’s Transmitted by Mosquitoes

Despite their size, mosquitos are some of the most dangerous insects on the planet. These flying ‘vampires’ can carry diseases and transmit them to humans. However, in most cases, if a mosquito bites a person, it will result in just an itchy nuisance.

NJ.com writes about a man in his 60s from Sussex County who tested positive for a rare virus that’s transmitted by the pesky flying parasites: Jamestown Canyon. The virus just infected the first person from New Jersey in six years.

Neurological problems and fever kicked in

Judith Persichilli, who is the Health Commissioner, spoke about the case, revealing that the man infected with the virus had to deal with neurological problems and a fever. Persichilli also said, as cited by NJ.com:

Spending time outdoors, whether walking, gardening, or playing with our dogs, is a good way to maintain physical and mental health, but it is important to take steps to prevent mosquito and tick bites, which are responsible for several diseases in New Jersey.

The Health Commissioner also issued a few guidelines to help us stay protected from mosquitoes and other “unwanted guests”:

When enjoying the outdoors, remember to use an EPA-registered insect repellent, cover skin with clothing when you can, and check yourself and your pets for ticks and quickly remove them with tweezers.

According to Wikipedia, the Jamestown Canyon virus causes Jamestown Canyon encephalitis, which is an infectious disease. Furthermore, the virus is an orthobunyavirus of the California serogroup, and it’s mainly spread during the hot summer days and nights by different species of mosquitoes across the US and Canada.

There are over 3,000 species of mosquitoes in the world, although only three of them are primarily responsible for the spread of diseases to humans.

Cristian Antonescu
Cristian is in love with technology as many of us. He has a vast experience as a content writer in the field. He's involved especially in the gaming area, where he covers the latest news in open-world, role-playing, and first-person shooter titles.